Saskatoon Police Commission Issues for the April 19, 2018 Meeting

The following topics are scheduled for the Thursday, April 19, 2018 @ 4:00 p.m. meeting of the Saskatoon Board of Police Commissioners in Committee Room E at Saskatoon City Hall:

·      Saskatoon Police Service Use of Force Report for 2017,

·      Semi-annual Saskatoon Police Service Missing Persons Report as of April 1, 2018, and

·      Saskatoon Police Service Report on the Financial Impact of the Cannabis Act on the Police Service.

Saskatoon Police Commission spokespersons, Chair Darlene Brander or Vice-Chair Carolanne Inglis-McQuay, will be available immediately after the conclusion of the Public Agenda to provide comments or respond to questions from the media. 

 As well, the two Police Commission representatives will make their best efforts to be available to address media questions on the morning following the April 19 Commission Meeting.

Contact: 
Saskatoon Board of Police Commissioners Chair Darlene Brander at info@saskatoonpolicecommission.com

Saskatoon Board of Police Commissioners Vice-Chair Carolanne Inglis-McQuay at
info@saskatoonpolicecommission.com

Dwight Percy, Consultant to the Saskatoon Board of Police Commissioners,
info@saskatoonpolicecommission.com or 306-222-1361

Download a PDF version here.

 

Issues to be Addressed at March 15 Police Commission Meeting

The following topics and issues are scheduled for the Thursday, March 15, 2018 @ 4:00 p.m. meeting of the Saskatoon Board of Police Commissioners in Committee Room E at Saskatoon City Hall:

·       Update on the Strengthening Families Program operated by Saskatoon Police Service,
·       2017 Year End Financial Report for Saskatoon Police Service,
·       Representative Workforce at Saskatoon Police Service, and
·       SPS Training Initiatives in the Sex Crimes and Child Abuse Unit

Saskatoon Police Commission spokespersons, Chair Darlene Brander or Vice-Chair Carolanne Inglis-McQuay, will be available immediately after the conclusion of the Public Agenda to provide comments or respond to questions from the media. As well, the two Police Commission representatives will make their best efforts to be available to address media questions on the morning after the March 15, 2018 Commission Meeting.

Additionally, a video of highlights of the Installation Ceremony for Police Chief Troy Cooper is on the Police Commission website at saskatoonpolicecommission.com

Contact:
Saskatoon Board of Police Commissioners Chair Darlene Brander at info@saskatoonpolicecommission.com

Saskatoon Board of Police Commissioners Vice-Chair Carolanne Inglis-McQuay at info@saskatoonpolicecommission.com

Dwight Percy, Consultant to the Saskatoon Board of Police Commissioners, info@saskatoonpolicecommission.com or 306-222-1361

 

Troy Cooper Sworn in as New Saskatoon Chief of Police

The Saskatoon Board of Police Commissioners has sworn in Troy Cooper as the new Chief of the Saskatoon Police Service. Chief Cooper assumes his responsibilities effective immediately.

Saskatoon Police Commission Chair Darlene Brander said, “The installation of Troy Cooper as Police Chief today is a highly important element of the Saskatoon Police Commission’s mandate. Our Commission has three strategic roles. One is to provide objective oversight of the Saskatoon Police Service. We accomplished that with the hiring of a highly qualified, and deeply experienced, Police Chief.”

Chair Brander continued, “Our Commission’s second role is to be a conduit between the public and the Saskatoon Police Service. We engaged the public at the outset of the recruitment process by asking what residents and groups wanted in their new Chief of Police. The public told us, and we found those attributes, in Chief Cooper. Thirdly, we have a mandate to operate effectively. And again, Chief Cooper’s history is one of constructive dialogue with the Police Commission with which he has interacted. We are very confident about the ability of our Commission and our Chief to maintain a healthy and productive working relationship.”

Newly installed Saskatoon Police Chief Troy Cooper stated, “I am honored to be sworn in as the new Chief of the Saskatoon Police Service, an organization that leads the public safety industry. It has set the bar for others in terms of responsiveness, transparency and accountability. I am grateful for the opportunity to serve the citizens of our City, and I am humbled to be a part of the Saskatoon Police Service.”

Chief Cooper was selected as Chief of Police for Saskatoon following a national recruitment campaign that began in September 2017 with a targeted timeline of having the new Police Chief in place in the 1st Quarter of 2018. The recruitment process, which was completed right on schedule, attracted highly qualified candidates. As was stated in January 2018, when Troy Cooper was introduced as Chief-Elect, the Commission was seeking a Chief of Police who is a true community leader, who has exemplary skills in their interaction with the community and has the proven ability to fully engage and motivate an outstanding Police Service. The Saskatoon Board of Police Commissioners is extremely pleased with the outcome of the recruitment and appointment process.

Contact:
Saskatoon Police Commission Chair Darlene Brander at info@saskatoonpolicecommission.com
Saskatoon Police Commission Vice-Chair Carolanne Inglis-McQuay at info@saskatoonpolicecommission.com
Dwight Percy, Consultant to the Saskatoon Police Commission, at info@saskatoonpolicecommission.com or 306-222-1361

 

Backgrounder on Saskatoon Police Chief Troy Cooper

Saskatoon Police Chief Troy Cooper - Perspectives and Priorities:
“My focus will be on maintaining the ‘professional gold standard’ of the Saskatoon Police Service and ensuring that it remains engaged in, and reflective of, the community it serves.

In order to protect the community, our officers must be safe themselves. Some of our early service review will be to ensure the dangerous elements inherent in policing are properly resourced.

With community support and diverse perspectives we will be well prepared to tackle the current pressures of complex new legislation and the impact of addictive drugs. Our province has seen an increase in weapons, particularly firearms, used by offenders and this risk has to be addressed.

In the last two years we have also faced an increase in addictive drugs and we anticipate this trend to increase as it has in other Western provinces. Root cause enforcement in this area is necessary so that officers are not overburdened by the spinoff effects of addiction.

Finally, we know that policing and public safety is a community effort. Preventing crime and addressing the environment that fosters the development of criminals will require partnerships with health care, social services, community groups and education providers. Community policing is a priority.” - Chief Troy Cooper

Saskatoon Police Chief Troy Cooper - Experience and Qualifications:

  • Chief of Police with the Prince Albert Police Service since 2012.

  • Prior to 2012, served in the following roles with Prince Albert Police Service: Deputy Chief of Police, Inspector in Charge of the Criminal Investigations Unit, Staff Sergeant, Detective Sergeant, Detective Corporal and Constable.

  • Education includes: Masters of Business Administration (MBA) in Law Enforcement & Security from Charles Sturt University, Bachelor of Professional Arts (BPA) in Criminal Justice from Athabasca University, and Certificate in Police Leadership Administration from Henson College at Dalhousie University.

  • Professional Development includes: Executive Development in Policing Program from Canadian Police College, Senior Police Administration Course from Canadian Police College, Senior Management Institute for Police from Boston College, Media Relations from Canadian Police College, Quality Assurance from Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police, Major Crimes from Canadian Police College, Criminal Intelligence Course from Criminal Intelligence Service Canada, Commanders Course from Canadian Police College, and Internal Affairs Investigations from Calgary Police / OPP.

  • Recognition and Awards include: Police Exemplary Service Medal, Saskatchewan Protective Services Medal, Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal, Governor General Order of Merit for Police Forces, Saskatchewan Centennial Medal, Sergeant E. Ryan Memorial Award as Police Officer of the Year, and Top Academic Recruit (Class 26) with Saskatchewan Police College.

  • Professional Affiliations and Activities have included: National Police Services’ National Advisory Committee, Saskatchewan Protective Services Advisory Committee, Chair of Saskatchewan Interoperability Interest Group, Co-Chair of Prince Albert HUB and COR Steering Committee, Regional Alcohol Strategy Committee, Prince Albert Youth Outreach Program, and Needle Exchange / HIV Strategy Committee. 

Download a PDF version here.

Saskatoon Police Commission Recap of Key Issues from February 15, 2018 Meeting

Expanded Police Commission:
The Saskatoon Board of Police Commissioners now consists of seven members with the addition of two civilians, Jo Custead and Kearney Healy. This brings the number of civilian members to four, constituting the majority of the Commission’s membership which is consistent with the practice in most Canadian cities.

Saskatoon Police Service “Care of our Community”:
During the Environmental Scan portion of the meeting, several Commissioners expressed their appreciation to the Saskatoon Police Service for the Service’s dedication to community safety following the release of the verdict in the Gerald Stanley case in North Battleford. Commissioners noted the care and attention paid by the Service that evening as well as during the rallies and marches held subsequently. The Police Service did an outstanding job of ensuring the safety of all members of the public throughout.

Traffic Enforcement Around Saskatoon:
Commissioners are asked on occasion about the Saskatoon Police Service traffic patrols that occur on highways surrounding Saskatoon, and in particular, why SPS resources are being used for this purpose. As reported at the meeting, neither Saskatoon Police Service resources nor local taxation fund this program. It is 100% funded by the provincial government and operated as a joint project between the RCMP and SPS. The results, as the Commissioners heard, are impressive – a decrease in traffic fatalities of more than 50% in the areas covered by this provincially funded traffic patrol initiative.

Commission Meetings in the Community:
Building on its role as a conduit between the public and the Saskatoon Police Service, the Board of Police Commissioners will be holding two of its 2018 meetings at venues outside of City Hall, at locations in the community. The Commission will provide updated information on the locations and format for the two meetings, which are intended to maximize interaction between the Commission and the public.

Contact:
Police Commission Chair Darlene Brander at info@saskatoonpolicecommission.com
Police Commission Vice-Chair Carolanne Inglis-McQuay at info@saskatoonpolicecommission.com
Dwight Percy, Consultant to the Saskatoon Police Commission, at info@saskatoonpolicecommission.com or 306-222-1361

Saskatoon Police Commission Issues for the February 15, 2018 Meeting

The following topics and issues are scheduled for the Thursday, February 15, 2018, 4:00 p.m. meeting of the Saskatoon Board of Police Commissioners.

·       Traffic Safety funding,

·       Combined Traffic Services Saskatchewan program report,

·       Board of Police Commissioners Strategic Plan Summary, and

·       Plans for hosting Police Commission meetings in the community.

Saskatoon Police Commission spokespersons, Chair Darlene Brander or Vice-Chair Carolanne Inglis-McQuay, will be available immediately after the conclusion of the Public Agenda to provide comments or respond to questions from the media. 

Please note: The meeting times for the Police Commission are now set for 4:00 p.m. in order to facilitate the full involvement of all Commissioners including those whose work schedules create challenges with mid-day meetings. It is also hoped that members of the public who wish to participate in the open forum portion of each Commission meeting will find the later afternoon meeting schedule more conducive to their involvement.

Given the challenges that may occur for some media outlets with their filing time requirements, the Police Commission representatives (Chair Darlene Brander and Vice-Chair Inglis-McQuay) will make their best efforts to be available to address media questions on the morning after each meeting. Additionally, a new email address (info@saskatoonpolicecommission.com) to reach the Chair / Vice-Chair has been added to facilitate enhanced access for the media.

Contact:

Saskatoon Board of Police Commissioners Chair Darlene Brander at info@saskatoonpolicecommission.com

Saskatoon Board of Police Commissioners Vice-Chair Carolanne Inglis-McQuay at info@saskatoonpolicecommission.com

Dwight Percy, Consultant to the Saskatoon Board of Police Commissioners, dwight@percycomm.ca or 306-222-1361

Saskatoon Board of Police Commissioners Approves Thunderchild Agreement

The Saskatoon Board of Police Commissioners signed off on its approval for police services as part of the City of Saskatoon service agreement with Thunderchild First Nation to a Thunderchild-owned property at 1135 Idylwyld Drive for purposes of the creation of an Entitlement Reserve under the Treaty Land Entitlement Agreement.

The agreement was signed on Monday, January 29, 2018, by Chair Darlene Brander on behalf of the Saskatoon Police Commission.

 

Saskatoon Board of Police Commissioners Announces Troy Cooper as New Saskatoon Police Chief

The Saskatoon Board of Police Commissioners today announced that Troy Cooper is the Police Chief-Elect of the Saskatoon Police Service. He commences his duties on February 28, 2018.

Commission Chair Darlene Brander said, “We are extremely pleased to announce the appointment of Troy Cooper as Chief of Police in Saskatoon. He is the candidate who will continue to motivate and engage our highly qualified Police Service while he concurrently engages with groups and residents throughout our city. We found the community leader we wanted.”

The planning process for recruitment, evaluation and selection of the next Chief of Police was launched in the summer of 2017. In early fall, the Commission announced the recruitment process was underway, and updated the public as the process moved ahead, noting that the Commission remained 100% on track with its stated schedule. From the outset, the Commission’s target was to have the new Chief in place by the first Quarter of 2018.

The standard set of responsibilities for a Chief of Police, include: the management, administration and operation of the Police Service; the maintenance of law and order; the prevention of crime within the City of Saskatoon; and the maintenance of discipline within the Police Service.

Chair Brander added, “Our Commission members knew, right from the start, that we were looking for more than the mandatory set of skills. We wanted to find a Chief of Police who was, among other things, a true community leader, who had displayed exemplary skills in his or her interaction with the community. And we wanted to find a Police Chief who has the proven ability to fully engage and motivate an outstanding Police Service.”

The Saskatoon Board of Police Commissioners communicated, on several occasions during the recruitment process, its complete level of satisfaction with the quality of applications received. The Commission can confirm that it received applications that were internal and applications that were external to the Saskatoon Police Service and can also confirm that it received applications from across Canada. Additional information on applicants cannot be provided in the interests of the confidentiality of the applicants.

Contact:
Saskatoon Board of Police Commissioners Chair Darlene Brander through the City Clerk’s Office at 306-975-3240.

Saskatoon Board of Police Commissioners Vice-Chair Carolanne Inglis-McQuay through the City Clerk’s Office at 306-975-3240.

Dwight Percy, Consultant to the Saskatoon Police Commission, 306-222-1361 or dwight@percycomm.ca

Backgrounder on Troy Cooper, Chief-Elect with the Saskatoon Police Service

Experience:

  • Currently, Chief of Police with the Prince Albert Police Service, a position he has held since 2012.
  • Prior to 2012, served in the following roles with Prince Albert Police Service.
  • Deputy Chief of Police
  • Inspector in Charge, Criminal Investigations Unit
  • Staff Sergeant
  • Detective Sergeant
  • Detective Corporal
  • Constable

Education:

  • Masters of Business Administration (MBA) in Law Enforcement & Security, Charles Sturt University
  • Bachelor of Professional Arts (BPA), Criminal Justice, Athabasca University
  • Certificate, Police Leadership Administration, Henson College, Dalhousie University

Professional Development:

  • Executive Development in Policing Program, Canadian Police College
  • Senior Police Administration Course, Canadian Police College
  • Senior Management Institute for Police, Boston College
  • Media Relations, Canadian Police College
  • Quality Assurance, Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police
  • Major Crimes, Canadian Police College
  • Criminal Intelligence Course, Criminal Intelligence Service Canada
  • Commanders Course, Canadian Police College
  • Internal Affairs Investigations, Calgary Police / OPP

Recognition and Awards:

  • Police Exemplary Service Medal
  • Saskatchewan Protective Services Medal
  • Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal
  • Governor General Order of Merit – Member, Police Forces
  • Saskatchewan Centennial Medal
  • Sergeant E. Ryan Memorial Award, Police Officer of the Year
  • Top Academic Recruit (Class 26), Saskatchewan Police College

Current Committees:

  • National Police Services, National Advisory Committee
  • Saskatchewan Protective Services Advisory Committee
  • Chair, Saskatchewan Interoperability Interest Group
  • Co-Chair, HUB / COR Steering Committee
  • Regional Alcohol Strategy Committee
  • Prince Albert Youth Outreach Program
  • Needle Exchange / HIV Strategy Committee

Two Members Added to Saskatoon Board of Police Commissioners

he Saskatoon Board of Police Commissioners has expanded to a seven-Member Board after Saskatoon City Council ratified two new Commission appointments on Monday, December 18.

Commission Chair Darlene Brander said, “Being a conduit between the community and the Police Service is a fundamental purpose of the Police Commission. The addition of two new Police Commissioners enables our Commission to execute on that strategy even more fully. Additionally, this aligns Saskatoon with the practice of most jurisdictions in Canada where civilian Board Members constitute the majority of Board membership.”

Leading up to the expansion of the Police Commission, the existing Commissioners developed a comprehensive criteria list for the consideration of Saskatoon City Council in its review of applicants. Atop that list were: strong connections with the community, a thorough understanding of the policy role of a Police Commission, and demonstrated commitment to the betterment of the Saskatoon community.

“We certainly found those traits in the two people whose appointments to the Commission were ratified by Council yesterday. Jo Custead has been a tireless volunteer in Saskatoon, providing her time and expertise to dozens of organizations, including some whose mandate focused on the interests of the multi-cultural community. She is highly connected throughout all parts of the community and will be very valuable to the Commission in its conduit role. Kearney Healy’s background in developing innovative approaches to deal with marginalized youth is just one example of the expertise he brings to the Commission. His understanding of these types of issues, combined with a demonstrated desire to forge new strategies to address them, means that he will also provide valuable guidance to the Saskatoon Board of Police Commissioners.”

Additional bio information on Commissioners Custead and Healy is available on the Saskatoon Board of Police Commissioners’ website at saskatoonpolicecommission.com.

Commission Chair Brander concluded, “The expansion of the Saskatoon Police Commission means that we are now even better positioned to be an effective conduit with the community, to gather input from people in the city, and engage the Saskatoon Police Service in discussions on approaches and strategies that ensure Saskatoon is a vibrant and safe community.”

Contact: Saskatoon Board of Police Commissioners Chair Darlene Brander through the City Clerk’s Office at 306- 975-3240.

Saskatoon Board of Police Commissioners Vice-Chair Carolanne Inglis-McQuay through the City Clerk’s Office at 306-975-3240.

The new Commission Members will be available for in-person interviews immediately following the Public portion of the next Police Commission meeting. 

Download as a PDF

Saskatoon police are trying to get to the root question of "Why?" when it comes to the city's missing persons problem

From Saskatoon StarPhoenix, November 17th, 2017

A report presented to the city’s board of police commissioners Thursday indicated calls for missing people ranked second in calls for service, as police predict by year-end, 2,764 missing person reports will be generated.

Between April 1 and Sept. 30, police received 1,382 missing persons reports, 625 of which were female youth and 441 for male youth. Between the two groups, 700 were classified as “habitual runaways” which means they’ve been reported missing two times or more.

In one instance, one female youth generated 40 missing person reports, with two male youth generating 50 and 49 calls respectively. In the same time frame, adults accounted for 312 missing person reports and “very rarely” fall under the definition of habitual.

City police are trying to address the issue by working with community organizations like EGADZ through its Operation Runway program.

An interagency-community partnership initiated by EGADZ, the program offers youth a chance to attend support circles where they can talk about why they run with youth mentors, constables from the SPS missing persons unit and community elders.

Since its launch in the spring, 29 of the circles have been held.

“By getting some of these youth to tell us why they’re going missing, we’re going to be able to reduce the numbers,” said Det. Insp. Russ Friesen with the Saskatoon Police Service investigative services. 

“If we can find out why they’re running, we might be able to help them with some tools that can better where they are, and make them more satisfied so they’re not always running away.”

Friesen said during the last 10 years, the service has “upped” its response to missing person cases and as part of a now complete pilot program launched earlier this year, select officers within a platoon are designated to work exclusively on missing persons cases once a report comes in.

The goal is to have these officers become experts in missing person cases — knowing where a person might go when they run, or what they might do — enabling them to locate them as soon as possible before a case is handed over to the missing persons unit.

This allows police to find people faster and provides more investigative avenues for the missing persons unit if a case is passed along after a four-day period, while providing officers with in-depth investigative experience in the process.

The Board of Police Commissioners will also be forwarding the report and what’s being done to address the issue to Saskatchewan’s Ministry of Justice and Ministry of Social Services.

Darlene Brander, chair of the Board of Police Commissioners, said stakeholders at all levels of government need to be involved.

“It’s a bigger issue than just Saskatoon,” she said.

“Runaways is just not a police issue. It’s a social issue. The more that we share that (information) with the province and within the community, it helps go toward solving that issue. It won’t solve it completely, but it will work toward at least bringing down those numbers.”

Mark Chatterbok, interim chief of the Saskatoon Police Service, said proactive work around missing persons is important, as the sooner police can identify why a person may be running, the quicker they can intervene with a potential solution and prevent it from occurring again in the future.

“Prevention is obviously the key to this,” he said.

In the previous six month period, police received a total of 1,229 between Oct. 1, 2016 to March 31, 2017 and the SPS is currently investigating 14 long-term missing person cases ranging in length from two years to several decades.

—By Morgan Modjeski, Saskatoon StarPhoenix

http://thestarphoenix.com/storyline/saskatoon-police-are-trying-to-get-to-the-root-question-of-why-when-it-comes-to-the-citys-missing-persons-problem